9 Best Mechanical Broadheads for Deer [2022]

Last Updated on August 20, 2022 by Brian Grossman

Lead image of our top pick for best mechanical broadhead.

There are an incredible number of broadheads on the market today, so choosing the best mechanical broadheads for your particular setup can be a daunting task. My hope is that this article will help you narrow down your choices to a manageable number so that you can make a final decision based on your needs and the information at hand.

All the broadheads listed below are well known, highly rated, and should fly like your field points if your bow is properly tuned. You can’t go wrong with any of them. I’ve shot several of these myself with good results, although I now prefer fixed blade broadheads for deer. I give you a quick list of my ten picks below, followed by additional detailed information for each broadhead. I also discuss the most important features to consider when choosing the best mechanical broadheads for your needs. Let’s get started!

ImageProductFeaturesPrice
G5 Outdoors DeadmeatG5 Outdoors Deadmeat
  • Available in 100 & 125 grains
  • 1 1/2-inch cutting diameter
  • Three blade
Check Price
Rage HypodermicRage Hypodermic
  • 100 grains
  • 2-inch cutting diameter
  • Two blades
Check Price
NAP KillzoneNAP Killzone
  • 100 Grains
  • 2-inch cutting diameter
  • Two blades
Check Price
NAP SpitfireNAP Spitfire
  • 100 grains
  • 1 1/2-inch cutting diameter
  • Three blades
Check Price
Swhacker 100 GrainSwhacker 100 Grain
  • 100 grains
  • 1 3/4-inch cutting diameter
  • Two blades
Check Price
Slick Trick RaptorTrick 2Slick Trick RaptorTrick 2
  • 100 grains
  • 2-inch cutting diameter
  • Two blades
Check Price
Rage Chisel Tip 2-BladeRage Chisel Tip 2-Blade
  • 100 grains
  • 2-inch cutting diameter
  • Two blades
Check Price
G5 Outdoors MegameatG5 Outdoors Megameat
  • 100 grains
  • 2-inch cutting diameter
  • Three blades
Check Price
Grim Reaper Razorcut SS Whitetail SpecialGrim Reaper Razorcut SS Whitetail Special
  • 100 grains
  • 2-inch cutting diameter
  • Three blades
Check Price

RELATED: 10 Best Crossbow Broadheads

Our Picks for Best Mechanical Broadheads

Best Overal Mechanical Broadhead
G5 Deadmeat

Photo of the G5 Deadmeat, our pick for best mechanical broadheads.

QUICK LOOK

  • Type: Mechanical
  • Weight: 100 or 125 grain
  • Number of Blades: 3
  • Cutting Diameter: 1 1/2 inch
  • Material: 100% Steel
  • Amazon Rating: 4.6 out of 5

The G5 Deadmeat is my choice for the overall best mechanical broadhead. I am a big fan of G5 Outdoors and their American-made products. The G5 checks all the boxes that make up a great mechanical broadhead: it’s solid steel, features three blades with a 1 1/2-inch cutting diameter for maximum damage, and the Snap lock system keeps the blades in place to prevent pre-deployment. The blades are rear-deploying, which I feel is a better design because they lose less energy during deployment, and the risk of deflection is less than with forward deploying blades.

In addition to its solid design, I like that the Deadmeat is offered in both 100 and 125 grains for those who may want a heavier setup. The three-pack of broadheads includes a Ballistic Match Point practice tip that matches the flight of the Deadmeat for easy practice without damaging your hunting broadheads. 

If you want a solid mechanical broadhead that hits hard and creates great blood trails, I highly recommend the G5 Deadmeat!


Best Two Blade Mechanical Broadhead
Rage Hypodermic

Photo of a Rage Hypodermic mechanical broadhead.

QUICK LOOK

  • Type: Mechanical
  • Weight: 100 grain
  • Number of Blades: 2
  • Cutting Diameter: 2 inch
  • Material: 100% Steel
  • Amazon Rating: 4.7 out of 5

No one sells more mechanical broadheads annually than Rage, and I doubt any broadhead on the market kills more deer. That doesn’t necessarily mean they’re the best, but they have done a great job of marketing over the years. Rage aren’t my favorite broadhead personally, but if I was going to shoot one it would likely be the 2-blade Hypodermic.

The chisel tip, combined with the 2-inch cutting diameter should result in decent penetration, plenty of damage, and a short blood trail. The rear deploying blades should minimize energy loss, and the improved shock collar technology ensures the blades stay in place until impact. I also like that this model Rage has a steel ferrule for maximum strength and durability.

The icing on the cake with these Rage broadheads is that you can often find them at a great price on Amazon. And despite what you may have heard, Rage broadheads are American-made.


NAP Killzone

Photo of a NAP Killzone mechanical broadhead.

QUICK LOOK

  • Type: Mechanical
  • Weight: 100 grain
  • Number of Blades: 2
  • Cutting Diameter: 2 inch
  • Material: Aluminum ferrule and steel blades
  • Amazon Rating: 4.6 out of 5

I have personally used and killed deer with the NAP Killzone mechanical broadheads. I really can’t say anything negative about them, other than I wished the long, tapered ferrule was steel rather than aluminum.

The Killzones are similar to the Rage discussed above in that they are rear deploying and feature a 2-inch cutting diameter. What I like about the Killzone is that is features a spring clip design for blade deployment that eliminates the need for any rubber bands, clips or retainers. I also like the hardened trophy tip designed to split bone and get maximum penetration.

If you’re looking for a 2-blade mechanical broadhead with a decent cutting diameter, then the NAP Killzone may be the perfect option. If it weren’t for the aluminum ferrule, I probably would have designated this as the Best Two Blade Mechanical Broadhead, but for now, the Rage Hypodermic gets that nod. You won’t go wrong with the NAPs either, though.


NAP Spitfire

Photo of an NAP Spitfire mechanical broadhead.

QUICK LOOK

  • Type: Mechanical
  • Weight: 100 grain
  • Number of Blades: 3
  • Cutting Diameter: 1 1/2 inch
  • Material: Titanium ferrule and stainless steel blades
  • Amazon Rating: 4.8 out of 5

The NAP Spitfire has killed its share of deer over the years. It’s a solid performing three-blade mechanical broadhead. I’m not a big fan of front deploying blades because I feel a lot of energy is lost when the blades have to pivot over themselves to get into cutting position. I also believe they are more prone to deflection on an angled shot. Having said that, though, there is no doubt the Spitfire can be effective on white-tailed deer.

I like the three-blade configuration with a 1 1/2-inch cutting diameter for plenty of damage. The CNC-machined titanium ferrule provides plenty of strength and durability, and the trophy tip should provide excellent penetration. I also like that the Spitfires is the patented spring clip technology that holds the blades in place without the need for any bands or clips, and the turned-out tips of the blades ensure they deploy on impact every time.


Swhacker 100 Grain

Photo of a Swhacker mechanical broadhead.

QUICK LOOK

  • Type: Mechanical
  • Weight: 100 grain
  • Number of Blades: 2
  • Cutting Diameter: 1 3/4
  • Material: Aluminum ferrule and stainless steel blades
  • Amazon Rating: 4.7 out of 5

Swhacker mechanical broadheads have a unique blade design with two separate cutting edges. The smaller wing blades are designed to cut the hide and first set of ribs, with the idea that the main blades will still be razor-sharp once they deploy in the body cavity for maximum damage to internal organs.

In my mind, two weak points on the Swhacker are the aluminum ferrule and the rubber bands used to hold the blades closed in flight. However, I do like the fact that there is little chance of the blades not deploying due to the wing blade design. And while they may not be my favorite broadhead, it’s hard to argue with a 4.7 out of 5 rating on Amazon. I also have mad respect for Levi Morgan as an archer and a bowhunter, and he is a big believer in Swhacker broadheads.


Slick Trick RaptorTrick

Photo of a Slick Trick RaptorTrick mechanical broadhead.

QUICK LOOK

  • Type: Mechanical
  • Weight: 100 grain
  • Number of Blades: 2
  • Cutting Diameter: 2 inch
  • Material: Stainless Steel
  • Amazon Rating: 4.6 out of 5

The Slick Trick RaptorTrick is a two-blade mechanical broadhead with a very slim profile for field-point accuracy. It features an all-steel design with a large 2-inch cutting diameter. I really like the four-edge, bone-splitting tip that’s part of the one-piece steel ferrule.

The forward-deploying blade design of the RaptorTrick is somewhat similar to the Swhacker in that they both have the small “wing blades” that deploy the large, main blades. The difference is, on the RaptorTrick, those wing blades are not sharpened to cut. They are simply there to deploy the main blades. Like the Swhacker, the RaptorTrick uses bands to keep the blades in place during flight.


Rage 2-Blade Chisel Tip SC

Photo of a Rage Chiseltip mechanical broadhead.

QUICK LOOK

  • Type: Mechanical
  • Weight: 100 grain
  • Number of Blades: 2
  • Cutting Diameter: 2 inch
  • Material: Aluminum ferrule with stainless steel blades
  • Amazon Rating: 4.7 out of 5

This is the second Rage mechanical broadhead on my list, and the most popular option in the Rage’s extensive lineup of broadheads. Like the Hypodermic, the Chisel Tip SC is 100 grain and features a 2-inch cutting diameter. The main difference is in the tip. The Hypodermic has a longer, tapered tip that is part of the overall one-piece steel ferrule. The Chisel Tip has a unique, twisted chisel tip that is made for breaking through bone. The reason I ranked this one below the Hypodermic is due to the weaker aluminum ferrule. Overall, though, this is still a great mechanical broadhead option.


G5 Megameat

Photo of a G5 Megameat  mechanical broadhead.

QUICK LOOK

  • Type: Mechanical
  • Weight: 100 grain
  • Number of Blades: 3
  • Cutting Diameter: 2 inch
  • Material: All steel
  • Amazon Rating: 4.7 out of 5

And here’s another G5 mechanical broadhead on my list. As I mentioned previously, the G5 Deadmeat is my overall pick for best mechanical broadhead. However, the G5 Megameat is certain to be a great option as well. The Megameat features the same three-blade design, all steel construction, and Snap lock construction to keep the blades in place. The main difference with the Megameat is the larger 2-inch cutting diameter.

The reason I chose the Deadmeat as my favorite as opposed to the Megameat, is that I think the 1 1/2-inch cutting diameter is ideal for a three-blade broadhead. If you prefer a larger cutting diameter and have a bow setup that will give you a pass-thru every time, then the Megameat may be the perfect option for you. One thing is for sure, you can’t go wrong with a G5 product.


Grim Reaper Razorcut SS Whitetail Special

Photo of a Grim Reaper Razorcut mechanical broadhead.

QUICK LOOK

  • Type: Mechanical
  • Weight: 100 grain
  • Number of Blades: 3
  • Cutting Diameter: 2 inch
  • Material: Stainless steel
  • Amazon Rating: 4.7 out of 5

The Grim Reaper Razorcut SS Whitetail Special is one of the few broadheads on my list that I haven’t shot. But they look great, have excellent specs, and a ton of great ratings on Amazon, so I thought they were worth a mention. They have a really cool and unique “mini-broadhead” steel tip for splitting hide and bone, prior to the three blades creating a nice 2-inch wound channel. The slim, streamlined design similar to the Slick Tricks should have them flying like darts from most any bow.


Pros and Cons of Mechanical Broadheads

Pros
  • Typically fly like field points with little to no bow tuning
  • Offered in large cutting diameters for maximum damage and great blood trails
  • Easy to replace blades to keep them in hunting condition
Cons
  • Prone to mechanical failure
  • More energy required for proper penetration
  • Not as durable as most fixe-blade broadheads 

Mechanical Broadhead Features to Consider

Broadhead Weight

Most mechanical broadheads are going to come in either 85, 100, 125 or 150 grains, with 100 grains being the most common. Any of these will work effectively. It’s really a matter of your overall arrow or bolt setup as to which weight you choose.

If you’re just going with a standard mid-weight arrow setup, then I’d recommend sticking with a 100 grain broadhead because they are readily available and will get the job done. However, if you’re like me and prefer a heavier arrow setup with a little higher FOC, then a 125 or even a 150 grain may be your best bet.

Even if you like a heavier setup, you can always use a 100 grain mechanical and add weight with a heavier brass insert or insert weight.

Two Blade vs Three Blade Broadheads

In your quest to find the best mechanical broadhead, you may wonder if you should you shoot a two or three blade broadhead. First off, let me say that either of those options will get the job done. Like most things in life, there’s tradeoffs to each option. A two-blade broadhead is going to have less resistance, so it will be more likely to pass thru an animal. The tradeoff to that reduced resistance and increased penetration is less overall tissue damage and a smaller blood trail.

Three blade broadheads, on the other hand, should produce a larger wound channel and better blood trail. And while they will have more resistance than a two-blade, as long as you’re shooting a heavy enough arrow setup, and/or enough poundage on your bow, penetration shouldn’t be an issue.

Cutting Diameter

Cutting diameter is another important factor when choosing a mechanical broadhead. Similar to the discussion above about the number of blades a broadhead should have, cutting diameter will impact penetration and the subsequent blood trail. A smaller cutting diameter will have less resistance and will be more likely to pass through, but it will also create a smaller wound channel. That smaller hole will me less overall tissue damage and a smaller blood trail.

That leaves you having to strike a balance between getting a solid pass-thru shot and still inflicting as much damage as possible for a good, short blood trail. Other factors in that decision will be your bow setup and overall arrow setup. If you shoot a lower poundage, short draw length, or a light arrow setup, then you will want to err on the side of smaller cutting diameter to ensure a pass-thru shot.

My preference is a 1 1/2-inch to 2-inch maximum cutting diameter from a mechanical broadhead.

Summary

Choosing the best mechanical broadhead is not easy. There are tons of options on the market today, and all of them will kill a deer with proper shot placement. That’s not to say, however, that some options aren’t much better than others. To narrow down your choice, use the factors outlined above, and you should find one or more great options from our list above.

Ultimately, you won’t go wrong with any of the broadheads listed above, but hopefully this article will help you find the best mechanical broadhead for your specific needs.

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